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The Headcount , What Your Age? And Your Story

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#1
JazAero

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Hi everybody,
 
Some of you know I started a thread similar to this in the SC forums. Entitled "Seniors Headcount…" https://forums.rober...-of-history/p1 
 
I would like to see how this translates To the Descent Underground community.! :-)
 
So tell us your age, Tell us how you got into gaming and anything else you would like to share about your history with computers and computer gaming. Or any other cool computer/game related anecdotes you may have.
 
I'll start off by saying this. I'll be 57 this year, I've been involved with computers over 35 of those years. I can't say when I got into computer gaming because when I started there was no gaming :-).
 
Okay maybe a little gaming… We played adventure on teletype on a PDP 11 in college. And then we had a sort of flight simulator where you typed in the action you wanted to take such as turn left 10° reduce speed 50 kn descent 500 ft./m, and then wait perhaps 10 minutes for the machine to spit out that you crashed short into the runway threshold. It was still a lot of fun and got me started with flight simulations. We got kicked out of the computer lab more than once for using up all the paper :-)
 
My first personal computer was an RCA COSMAC sadly it was lost in an apartment burglary many years ago but it looked just like this one.  
 
mt2.jpg those switches program the machine in direct binary. And it was an amazing platform to learn the fundamentals of how computers function and yet we were still able to play a sub hunt game with only 256 bytes of RAM.
 
 
My next desktop computer and the ones I still own (this photo was taken in my basement!), The Atari 800 series and all its peripherals.
J8forg8.jpg
 
This was a computer that my brother and I became qualified experts in. there was actually nothing we could not do with these machines.  these machines introduced us to the first space game we ever saw with real graphics "Star Raiders" and for a few years I even ran a BBS called "the electronic shop" 
 
I played every flight simulator and just about every space game written. I'm retired now and still keep my feet wet with all technology.
 
35+ years of computing you tend to collect a lot of toys. My wife says that at least it keeps me home and out of trouble. LOL
 
Go ahead and introduce yourselves and tell us your story

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#2
Drakona

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Sure. Uh, I'm 32 years old.

I grew up on the unix machines my dad brought home from work. I met the command line at four or five years old, and quickly mastered it. There was a running joke at my dad's work -- a group of the same type of machine had a post-it note on them that said, "For Tech support, call Catherine" and had our home phone number. I was six years old at the time. ;) It wasn't until I was in about 4th grade that I knew anything else. In fact, the first time I met a non-*nix machine, I thought it simplistic and gutless . . . an opinion I haven't really had reason to revise over the years. ;)

I've been into gaming for as long as I can remember. The first games I remember playing were ports of arcade games on dad's unix box. I played Battlezone, Missile Command, Asteroids, and Star Wars . . . a LOT. Really, there wasn't much else I would rather do. I also played Colossal Cave Adventure. I loved them all, but probably Battlezone the most, because I could play against my dad. Guess I could say I liked the FPS from the beginning. :)

Throughout elementary school, I never had a console -- but my friends all had Nintendos and I sure liked those. I played over at their houses a LOT. And my best friend in 5th grade had a copy of Star Control (or maybe Star Control 2?) on his home PC. I'm not sure, exactly, but I think he may have been my best friend for that reason? ;) Anyway, I played a ton of space battles against him, I clearly remember that much. I wanted a Nintendo at home, and my mom said if I wanted one so badly, I could buy it myself . . . so in 6th grade? I DID. Brand new Super Nintendo, with my own money. That was the first gaming machine I had at home other than the unix boxes. I have many fond memories of Mario Kart and Starfox from that thing.

I missed out on most of early PC gaming. My parents, like many parents in the 80's, did not approve of violent video games. So I didn't meet DOOM until I was in college. My introduction to PC gaming was Descent . . . which was, fortunately for me, not a violent game. My dad bought me a copy of the game for my 13th birthday, around the same time as we got our first family PC -- a pentium 90! I had no idea what Descent was, but when I booted it up the first time and flew in a 360 degree circle . . . I fell in love hard. I have never looked back.

I've played a lot of other games over the years -- in fact, there aren't many genres I haven't touched -- but Descent was my first love, and I've never found anything I love more. So that's more or less how I got here.
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#3
LotharBot

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I'm 34 years old, and started gaming very young.  My dad was a programmer for the phone company (Mountain Bell -> US West -> Qwest -> Century Link) and had a TRS-80 Model 1 in the basement, which was still sitting in the same spot when I bought the house from him decades later.  I don't remember actually using it, though; by the time I was old enough to be forming computer memories, in 1983, we had a SANYO MBC-550 (actually upgraded to the 555 with the second floppy drive), and my dad bought a box of colored floppies so he could put custom programs for each kid on their color-coded disks.

 

"Chuck's Blue Disk" had my favorite program -- a math program dad wrote for me in some scripting language that had basic painting capabilities.  I'd start the program and it would write a math program in giant font (like, two-inch-high letters, which was pretty impressive on a 12-inch color screen; the 10-inch monochrome black-and-green screen ran the terminal.)  If I typed in the right answer, it would draw a giant happy face.  If I typed in the wrong answer, I got a giant sad face.  Then it repainted the screen a different color and wrote a new problem.  My dad actually used to pack up the computer (in the carrying case the TRS-80 had come in) and take it to local schools and do presentations for children, most of whom had never seen a computer even as late as 1987 or 1988.

 

By the late 1980s, we had a Gateway 2000 386DX-20 that cost a whopping $5,000.  My older brother used to dial in to a local BBS and play games like Global Wars (a Risk clone), Land of Devastation, and Legend of the Red Dragon.  He also played Wolfenstein 3D, which I tried out but couldn't really get the hang of, and dozens of other shareware games like Jill of the Jungle, Raptor:Call of the Shadows, Tank Wars, and Scorched Earth.  When the DooM shareware came out, I was just old enough to start to understand tactical movement, and I fell in love with the idea of running around with a chainsaw and a rocket launcher and a shotgun and blasting demons.  A little while later I went to COMDEX (the giant computer show in Las Vegas) with my dad, and convinced him to buy me a copy of DooMII, and a few months later he bought a new computer that had Descent:Destination Saturn included.  (I still play both DooM, using the Zandronum port, and Descent, using Retro mod.)


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Come play original Descent! Full version setup instructions or Shareware unzip-and-play
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#4
GaVol

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42.  Started in tech in '93.  Computer Ops, System Programmer, Solaris Admin (I switched sides more than once), SCO Admin, Linux Admin, HP/UX Admin, General IT (including Windows, sigh) and management since 2003 (Director of IT at one place, now a Development Manager).

 

I remember playing Skyfall on a UNIX connected terminal at Systems Engineering Laboratories (Gould, Encore) in the 1980s where my parents worked.  I never had a computer until after I was on my own.  Yet I spent hours at school writing BASIC programs for fun (back when diskless PCs would boot to just a BASIC prompt).

 

I couldn't ever really afford many games, so I only bought the ones that my friends very strongly endorsed, or were "shareware".  I actually spent a great deal of time playing Ken's Labyrinth (a shareware Wolfenstien knock-off).  My favorite games were flight simulators (not really games at all) or racing games.  Slipstream 5000 was a favorite in that area.  I played the Doom and Doom II shareware a lot.  When Descent came out, it really rocked my imagination, with all the flight elements, and the whole idea of being able to flip upside down at any point.  That was awesome, and it still is.  I have yet to find another game that captured my interests in the same way Descent did.

 

Which means that I'll be really easy to disappoint with Underground.  It is too important to me.  I know this, so I won't be outwardly angry, I'll just disappear.


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#5
skuripanda

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35. Started on a 286, but the first computer I really played with was a 486 100mhz with 20mb of RAM and a Diamond Stealth Video VRAM graphic card.

 

DOS, Windows 3.11, later Windows 3.11 with Power Tools overlay.

 

Loved meddling with Memmaker to make different games run better... or rather... AT ALL.


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Unless I post in the official moderator blue, I'm just another fan posting my own thoughts, and my posts should not be taken as official in any capacity.

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#6
DeserveVictory

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I'm turning 25 this year. I don't really remember anything from before I was 13, but I do remember playing Descent 1 and 2, Pitfall: The Mayan Adventure, and a few other games. A few years ago I had an itch to play Descent again now that I'm older and more competent at games and I really enjoyed it. A few months ago I wanted to play it again but this time co-op with friends. No one was really interested but the idea of playing with other people stuck with me.

 

I study and play games to learn about how they're designed and "What makes this game good versus another?" I play Super Smash Bros. Melee competitively at a fairly high level (though I'm not very good compared to the people who are actually good ha ha) and I have been world class at a couple of other games. A part of my studies of games has led me to try to understand "What is skill?" and to understand how games can be designed to allow, promote, and reward skillful play.

 

I always enjoy finding a new game to immerse myself in; whether it be a well designed competitive multiplayer experience or an engaging single player experience. Recently my melee related activites have lulled a bit and coincidentally D:U was kickstarted. I thought to myself "I've always wanted to learn to fly better, and this could be a multiplayer experience I really get behind if it's good. Might as well start now so I can beat the flood of new people to D:U." So a week ago I used my knowledge of the online multiplayer Descent community (I've visited the Rangers website a few times over the years) to start playing and now I'm really glad I did.

 

I'm greatly enjoying becoming part of a new community, experiencing this new fantastic game, and I am looking forward to more good experiences with D:U single and multiplayer.


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#7
Louhikarme

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Turning 40 this year.

First computer i had was C64, but before that i had already been shown the way by friends vic-20. was bout 6 at that time. C64 years are bit vague, but that was the first time i realised computers was the thing i liked. Tried to even write some simple games with c64, but they never got to working and having only cassette player in it wasn't even sure how to save all the work into a tape.

Amiga500 was next stop, with that i got listen some awesome music made by people around the world, which was great. tried some with screamtracker and some others myself, but it never got to anything serious. First pc was 386/40mhz beast with a s3 gfx card. :)

From there on i was building my pc:s myself. and by 20 i had the worst idea stuck in my head, can't remember where i got it but it was never mix job and fun. hence with my limited mind, thought that if i went into game business it would take away the magic of gaming. how wrong i was.

That lead me more into technical aspects of computers, and in all not sorry for it, i liked to pull things apart and then put them back again. and for 10 yeas i enjoyed my job working with the latest gadgets. :) and also using my freetime to play games. alot games. :)

fast forward 20 years and much has happened, found my love of life. still playing games (wouldn't be here if i werent).

but also something changed, workwise there is bigger changes coming, which were well in advance so it sparked motivation to go back to old friends like C# and modeling. and last august met 4 nice gentlemen, Paul Gilbert, Andy Timmons, Mike Keneally and Joe Satriani. Had nice guitar camp i attented which made me realise alot things. And coming back to home couple things happened at work that made sure my motivation was in place.

I changed my game time to a Blender/photoshop/unity/ue4 research and learning. and i guess you can see where this is going. career change.

Thats about it. :)


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#8
LotharBot

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 I have been world class at a couple of other games.

Which games?


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Come play original Descent! Full version setup instructions or Shareware unzip-and-play
Voice chat on Descent Rangers Mumble server address mumble.descentrangers.com port 31393

#9
MangoMon

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Like DV, turning 25 this year (November). Met my first computer when I was 4, old Intel 486. Ran Windows 3.1, might have been Windows 95 though I can't remember. I still remember that black and orange screen that says "It is now safe to turn off your computer" :P . Anyway, I was hooked from day one, trying to do anything a 4 year old can think off on a comp. Worst I did was go into "System32" and deleting all the icons there that "wasn't pretty" :P . But from there I dedicated almost all my free time to figuring out what I can do with the comp to a point where almost everybody that I know calls me if there's some tech related error. Even some of the teachers in high-school asked me for advice from time to time and a couple of days later I got a call from a friend works as a lawyer, asking me to help restart their network. That was fun :D
 
On the gaming side, first game played was Bio-menace, the old Apogee game. Played the game quite a lot (took me a while to get the sound to work), and after playing the game through I developed an irrational fear of the word "boss" :P (which I got over later on :D ). After Biomenace came Supaplex and Prehistorik 2 from a friend of my mom's. Could never finish the former, but played the latter until I knew every level like the back of my hand. Then came Descent 2. Loved the game from the first minute, and when I saw the "To be continued" ending I wanted to make Descent 3 just to continue the story. Didn't happen as real D3 came out but I still credit that moment to what got me started in software development. After Descent came a slew of other games; anything from racers, to shooters, to strategy, to RPG. Played them all, though I'm not very good at racers. Only genres I stay away from is MOBA's and MMO's; partly because the community is usually full of... very irritating people... partly because of the subscription model they usually follow, and partly I don't want to play the same map over and over. Used to have similar opinions about online multiplayer matches, though that opinion has changed. 
 
Hmm... yeah that's me :D

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#10
CDN_Merlin

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Age:45

 

Started in computer in the mid 80's with Lotus 1,2,3 and DBASE 3+ and some ancient DOS.

Got my first PC in 1994.  486sx2-66.

 

My dad gave me a subscription to a local BB and I downloaded D1 shareware.  Fell in love right away.  I played D1/D2/D3 non stop until maybe 2002ish when I my wrists couldn't handle the intensity of playing hard for hours on end.

 

I went back to college in 2003 to get a Diploma in Computer System Technician and currently working for as secret organization which I can't talk about or else I'll have to take down these boards.  lol

 

I'm also in racing games (waiting for Project Cars) and big time into Diablo 3.


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#11
WarclawThunderHammer

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I suppose I'll jump in on this. I'm a bit of young one I guess - I'm 23. 

 

My first experiences with video games was when I was around 4 or 5 - My parents had this old Windows 95 PC that my older sisters used for typing papers for school or whatever, but I just looked around in the games folder. For some reason, this thing had a bunch of awesome games on it - I still have no idea how they got there. One of them was the shareware of D1, along with Pitfall, the mayan adventure, Journeyman, and a bunch of Maxis Sim games. (Sim Ants, Sim Copter, Sim Tower, Sim City...) So that was what I played. The D1 demo was my favorite of all of them. It took me forever to get a handle on the controls... yikes. I remeber calling the 1-800 line to actually get the full game... by this time the number they had in the shareware was already disconnected... 

 

Fast forward to college and I got the urge to play Descent again, so I found the whole rebirth thing, and played through the full versions of D1 and D2 for the first time. I never actually played multiplayer - I figured I would get my butt kicked. My friends were all like "what the heck are you playing? It looks terrible!" I started D3, but I couldn't get a handle on how different it felt. I think this is mainly what inspired me to build my first gaming PC - I was tired of playing on my tiny old laptop screen and overheating it. Fast forward a few more years, and I'm now a software engineer. I still play games quite often, and would like to get into game development a bit, but I don't really have the time right now - friends, bars, and full time jobs don't mix well with hobbies... but I can't complain.


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#12
G'lek

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I myself am turning 23 in under a month, but gaming has always been a part of my life.

 

There are pictures in my family photo album of myself, as a young child, in a Jolly Jumper (I don't know the actual term, just the brand) with a keyboard, banging on it happily. I guess that's the earliest point I can tie back to computers in my life.

 

In terms of gaming, I used to watch my father play games such as the Descent: Test Flight demo and later, Descent itself. I had an old BBS demo disc and I played every game it had. That was the birth of my life as a gamer. As the years moved on, I moved forward to Myst, The Journeyman Project and System Shock 2, all of which are favorites along with Descent and games like Full Throttle and Star Wars: Jedi Knight - Dark Forces (1 and 2).

 

I disconnected from games for a number of years during high school. Then my parents bought me the Orange Box for a birthday and I discovered Valve and Steam. In the six years since I got Steam, my library has grown to almost 400 games, worth well over $5000 CAD, with just shy of 2000 hours of play time, and that's just what Steam records.

 

My passion for gaming and computers led me to my career in software engineering and programming. I graduated from university with a degree in software engineering from Carleton University in 2014 and am currently employed by a local software development company creating IP-TV and set-top box solutions.

 

Gaming is a passion for me, a passion that has guided many of my choices in life, including my post-secondary education (I originally wanted to go into game development and still would like to break into that industry some day).


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#13
Vorxion

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First Name:  Mark

Age:  44

 

Got into gaming with the original Pong console from Sears (yes, the one that would fry Zenith televisions after six months), and have had a slew of consoles since.  Skipped a few console generations, but I've had a -lot-.

 

Got into PC gaming around Wolfenstein3D on a 386.  Been gaming on PC since then as well.

 

Had D1 and D2 on my 486 systems.  I have D3 from GoG, but have never actually played more than half the first level or so, I think, just to make sure it worked.

 

I am -horrible- at finishing games.  I do finish games, just a lot more rarely than you'd expect.  I often get pulled away by, "Ooh, shiny!" and then have to restart when I get back to one.  (Took me four restarts after hiatuses to finish Dead Space, for instance...and I loved that game!)

 

I have a bigger backlog than I can shake a stick at.  I'm often playing 3-5 games concurrently. 

 

Other Hobbies:  Music (both listening and producing), Reading, Programming


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KS Backer #2314 - Original D1/D2 player. Own D1, D2, D3 from GOG.com.
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#14
blessu

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Well, if your interested, I was 60 yesterday....for time reasons that was 23/04/15, St Georges day in England. I still play rugby for Esher RUFC. Yes, really. I started with computers when I was a Police Officer. Black screen green writing. I learned to type on a proper typewriter so had a head start on the keyboard. It was a no brainer for me...this was the way to go. So, to make sure I got to grips with it I bought me own system back in the early 90's, a packard bell. My first real foray into gaming was D1, then 2 then 3. I have been hooked ever since.  


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'don't get caught'

#15
Mickey1

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Mickey1 from the Fort of Wayne (67). Played D1 and D2 on 2 Playstations in combat mode with my son. I started playing D3 with the Demo in 98. When PXO shutdown I was ranked number 20 as an Ensign with 84900 kills.  Today on d3stats.de I am ranked 26 with 83675 kills. I like D3 better than D1 or D2. I'm  a B-Team pilot who likes flying the Phoenix with Vauss and all the missile I can fire.   I haven't played since 2012. Hope to be back soon. The videos posted here are a great incentive to work faster. I use a keyboard, mouse and 4 foot buttons.  Vauss you soon, just for the fun of it.


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#16
Rook

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I'm 34 years old, and I grew up around computers as my dad was a Network Administrator for a hospital. 
Early mornings before school started I would sit and play ancient DOS games on an IBM 8088. 
Shortly after D1 came out, I was walking around a Sam's Club with my folks and they happened to have the game
demo running on one of their display desktops. I tried it and was instantly entranced. 
I quickly delved into online play where I mostly hung out on the old Kahn gaming service. D2 was my favorite 
for online play. By the time D3 came out I was officially retired from online play... That is until I found Descent: Underground. 
I'll be contributing to participate in alpha / beta asap. It's good to officially be here and meet everyone.


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"If the doors of perception were cleansed, every thing would appear to man as it is, Infinite."
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#17
Sirius

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28. Like many others here, video games and particularly Descent may have influenced my career/career choice :)

 

I started doing stuff with PCs pretty young, roughly 1990 I think - family-friendly titles at first (Alley Cat, Supaplex, Dragon Strike are a few titles that stuck in my mind), and a little later PC platformers like Jill of the Jungle, Xargon, and the first couple of Duke Nukem games. A handful of adventure games too - Myst, Riven, Indiana Jones... before the 3D bug bit :)

Started with Descent after noticing the shareware in a gaming magazine at some point, and... that was most of what I played from late 96 for a few years. Went on Kali in 97, multiplayer and level-building followed. I think level-building in combination with a few people I met gave rise to my interest in building games and programming from that.

 

And so, quite a few years hence, that's what I did in university... didn't enter the video game industry (have considered it though) but it's still more or less what got me here. Went to Microsoft, moved to the US, rest is history.


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#18
Screwball

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I'm 46 and my first game console was a Magnavox Oddessy 3000.

https://encrypted-tb...AtkuLQcNUvqp2pA

In the early 80s, I had a lot of fun playing games on my friends' Apple ][, TI 99/4a, C64, and Atari computers. Eventually, I got myself a Timex-Sinclair 1000, where I played my first flight sim and started to learn programming.

At some point, my dad brought home a Kaypro 10, running CP/M with a 10 MB hard drive. I played a lot of the classic text games by Infocom on that. I loved that machine, and to this day I think it had the best keyboard I've ever used. Eventually, we got a PC, running MS-DOS, and it was like this mutant version of CP/M, but it was the future. Around 1985, I started helping my dad build and repair whitebox PC's from components, and with one exception, I've custom built all my own PC's ever since.

I was a huge fan of the Wing Commander series, Privateer, X-Wing, Tie Fighter, Doom, and other games during college, though perhaps surprisingly I never played any of the original Descent series. I also greatly enjoy PnP role playing games including D&D, Shadowrun, 7th Sea, and others. My multiplayer 6DOF experience comes from playing Vendetta Online for 2.5 years a while back.
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#19
Void Stalker

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Shoot.. I’ll play.

 

I’m about to turn the big 3-6.  Though most days I feel a solid 50. J

 

I grew up in a rural WV mining town.  All of the traffic on the road in front my house were miners going to and from work. Past the road was the Little Coal River, and on its bank were the train tracks, with a steady stream of trains carrying money out of the mountains, day and night.

 

Being from a small town, my parents wanted me to “get ahead by using my head”. So when I was 10 or so, Mom bought me a computer, an IBM 386, knowing it would hook me on “the future”.  It did, and from that day on, my young mind was occupied learning DOS, reading books by Peter Norton, flipping through Computer Shopper, and playing games like X-Wing, Wing Commander, Wolfenstein 3D, and the like.

 

That obsession with computers and technology rubbed off on my friends, and we all got into the computer scene of the 90s, playing single player campaigns and even network games over serial cables, and the modem. Descent was a favorite, as was any space sim or flight sim we could get our hands on. We all upgraded around the same time, “Nerds in Sync”, moving up to 486 DX2s, then to Pentiums.  I worked my entire summer when I was 16 just to buy a motherboard, CPU and some RAM. My friends did too.

I was into it enough to have a 2nd PC, and really enjoyed BBS systems, so I started my own in my bedroom at an early age. I had paying subscribers, and a couple of phone lines in. It was a good experience for a kid, pre-internet, running messaging, online games, shareware, wares, etc.  All through High school,   my group of friends all stuck together, with computers as major hobby, chasing girls and drinking beer as the other. (What else was there in Rural WV?).  I guess we were “hipsters” a full decade before there were hipsters. J

 

Anyways, moving on, I started my career selling computers at a big box, getting a job doing it the day after I graduated high school.  Within 6 months I was managing the department. That led to a lot of connections and I eventually caught the eye of a group that wanted to get into venture capital investing in the new-fangled Internet.  They liked that I ran a successful BBS and wanted me to startup and run an ISP. Next thing you know, 18yo me had a check for $500,000, a napkin for a business plan, and a lot of ambition.  I was able to start it up, get staff, and get customers flowing in, thousands of them.  I had several POPs, and game servers for everything like Quake (I had a T1 in my house) and some of the other early multiplayer games. But, age and lack of experience was not my friend and we wound up closing up shop a year later. I just didn’t have enough customers to cover all of the costs.  Major lesson learned, and it drove me further with my career.

 

Over the next decade or so, I stayed true to my passion, working with computers, and carried on with a new passion, business melded with technology.  I still played games with vigor, as most 20-somethings do. But in my spare time I hit the books, with an insatiable lust for knowledge. I wanted to know “everything about everything”, and so I went for and got an MCSE... then a CCNA... a CCDA... A+.  Everything I could computer related.

 

That sting of going out of business and “blowing my chance” fueled me to go back to school too. So while working full time as a Systems Administrator, I went to college full time. I worked hard and graduated with a Business Degree, full honors and a 4.0GPA. 

 

Just when I had achieved so much, and thought I was heading for success, a lot of really unfortunate stuff hit my personal life. I lost both of my awesome parents over a 2 year stretch (Cancer and Heart Disease.) and then the company I worked for (EDS) sold out to HP and I was out of a job too. A bunch of other stuff I won’t post here happened in the middle. So I wound up having to move, and start a new career as a Developer and Business Analyst.  A major change from being an Infrastructure expert.  But what are you going to do?

 

I Did that for several years until I got into publishing when I wrote my first book. (Aeternum Ray), and that made me all sorts of new connections. I found I had a real passion for the technology of book making, layout, design, and the business of books.  Next thing you know I had a new business venture come into my life, and an opportunity to work for myself, and that has been my passion ever since.  Games have taken a back seat to that (and family life) for the last few years. But, I still enjoy a good game, and to see a startup come to life, so that has drawn me into here with you fine folks.

 

I hope I didn’t ramble too much, or give too much away.


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-Tracy,  Founder, The Tunnel Rats

"Just remember this - it is amazing what can be accomplished when no one cares who gets the credit." -Wingman

Note: Everything I post is as a fan of Descent: Underground except for official statements - which will be written in Moderator Blue.


#20
homeyduh

homeyduh
  • Backer
  • 80 posts
  • Joined: 18-March, 2015
24 years old. Been playing Descent for as long as I can remember (it came out when I was 4, but my dad was into it). I've only played SP mode until a few years back when I played a few matches online. I'm nothing compared to others who've played MP for a long time. Descent is easily my favorite game series of all time, topping modern games like Battlefield 3, Super Smash Bros, etc.

I've always been interested in level design and a king video games, but I convinced myself that it was a fools dream and that I should seek a more practical job, like In the medical field, which is my current field of study. I love medicine. I love helping people...but I also love video games. My first experience with level design was DMB2 in which I made some pretty poopy maps for Descent 1 and 2. I was terrible. Then I found Halo 3's Forge mode, an in-game modular level editor. It was a crude editor so I did not make many maps...until Halo Reach when the editor evolved into something so much greater! When I received encouraging compliments on my map design skills, I knew that I had something good there. I left it alone for a few years then I bumped into the Sol Contingency project and saw that they needed a mapper. I had very crude and unprofessional experience with nothing to show the team that could speak for me. At that point (last year in February) I picked up the UDK and taught myself how to create maps on A serious basis: using the tools that game designers really used And sure enough, I got the position in December of last year. Since then, it's been a blast helping these guys make an awesome game!

Other than that, I'm married with a daughter and twins on the way. It's gonna be craaaaaaazy!
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Sol Contingency mapper, Descent 1 and 2 fan, Community Relations, and all-around nice guy.

Twitter: @homeyduh





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